Justifications for Planning

Why do we plan? And who plans?

Planning is usually conflated with collective action, collective choice, communication, centralisation and coordination. One of the central justifications for planning is to provide for public goods and to correct for externalities. I aim to show that these conflations and justifications are not only wrong. They provide neither a positive nor a normative framework for understanding plans and planning. Plans need account for decision situations that are fluid, uncertain, ambiguous and where decision-making authorities are fractured and have to be negotiated. The point of planning is to lay bare these complexities (to some extent) and allow us to make better decisions.

The professional practise of planning is not limited to planners employed in the public sector. But planning is an interaction that happens in a multi-organisational enviornment, where actors enter, leave and morph, and have different agendas and power relations. Such nuanced view of planning requires us to go beyond the conventional justificaitons of planning and to rethink the roles of planners.

Collaborators

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Nikhil Kaza
Associate Professor

My research interests include urbanization patterns, local energy policy and equity

Publications

Deliberative democracy often presumes that the deliberators are members of a political community that often share common understanding …

If urban development plans were just target patterns to be achieved, conventional data structures in GIS would be sufficient. Urban …

Problem: The practice of scenario plan- ning is often too focused on developing a single preferred scenario and fails to adequately …

Wide participation, in the urban planning context, is justified as the means of balancing multiple interests outside the traditional …

Using plans and regulations when making decisions about urban development requires access to the many plans and regulations of many …

Why are many plans not implemented? Common explanations for this question are planners have little power, or they failed to account for …
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